Reading List

The Workers Cup Delve Deeper Reading List

Fiction For Younger Readers

Curtis, Jamie Lee and Laura Corness. This is Me: A Story of Who We Are & Where We Come From. New York: Workman Publishing, 2016.

In This Is Me a teacher tells her class about her great-grandmother’s dislocating journey from home to a new country with nothing but a small suitcase to bring along. And she asks: What would you pack? What are the things you love best? What says “This is me!” With its lively, rhyming language and endearing illustrations, it’s a book to read again and again, imagining the lives of the different characters, finding new details in the art, thinking about what it would be like to move someplace completely different.

Duncan, Tonatiuh. Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote: a Migrant’s Tale. Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2013.

When Papa Rabbit does not return home as expected from many seasons of working in the great carrot and lettuce fields of El Norte, his son Pancho sets out on a dangerous trek to find him, guided by a coyote. Includes glossary and author’s note about illegal immigration and undocumented workers.

Munsch, Robert and Saoussan Askar, illustrated by Rebecca Green. From Far Away. Annick Press, 1995.

Although first published in 1995, From Far Away is more relevant today than it has ever been. This story is based on the real-life experience of Saoussan Askar, who emigrated with her family from war-torn Lebanon when she was seven years old. While still in elementary school, Saoussan wrote to bestselling author Robert Munsch about her situation. Together, they turned her story into a book.

Peet, Mal. Exposure. Candlewick Press, 2010.

When a black South American soccer star signs on to a team in the country’s racist south, headlines blare. And when he falls for the sensual Desmerelda, a stunning white pop singer and daughter of a wealthy politician, their sudden and controversial marriage propels the pair to center stage, where they burn in the media spotlight. But celebrity attracts enemies; some very close to home. And its dazzle reaches into the city’s hidden corners, exposing a life of grit and desperation the glitterati could never imagine.